Adhesion signaling is disrupted in cancer cells. This image shows how we visualize cell adhesions using immunofluorescence microscopy. Each color marks a different protein that is present in adhesions that form between the cell and the extracellular matrix. Courtesy of Drs. Karen Martin and J. Thomas Parsons

Cancer Biology at UVA focuses on cutting-edge basic, translational, and clinical research in a highly collaborative environment.  Our research is significantly enhanced by being part of an NCI-designated Cancer Center whose mission is in part to discover the fundamental causes of cancer and develop new knowledge into tools for cancer treatment, diagnosis, and prevention.

For over 35 years the University of Virginia Cancer Training Program has been preparing students for productive careers in academia, industry and education.  Students pursue research under world-renowned faculty in areas such as cancer cell signaling, genetics and epigenetics, chemical and structural biology, immunology and immunotherapy, inflammation and cancer, and interactions between tumor cells and non-transformed stromal components of the tumor microenvironment.

Integration of student training with the UVA NCI-designated Cancer Center provides an exceptional opportunity to prepare students for leadership roles in all aspects of cancer research and to ultimately shape the future of this rapidly expanding area of biomedical research.  Students work closely with research teams in women’s oncology, lung cancer, gastrointestinal cancers, hematopoietic malignancies and stem cell research.  This research is augmented by state-of-the-art research and clinical facilities that deliver new and innovative therapies to patients.

 

Faculty