• 29Sep
  • 03Oct

    Oct 03 PRPR

    [MR5, Room #3005]

  • 03Oct

    Oct 03 PRPR

    [MR5, Room #3005]

  • 03Oct
  • 03Oct

    Oct 03 CIC Seminar Series: Cheong-Hee Chang, PhD "Regulation of inflammatory immune responses by metabolic homeostasis of innate T cells"

    [Jordan 1-17] Cheong-Hee Chang, PhD, Professor, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Michigan Medical School

  • 05Oct

    Oct 05 A PLAGUE ON ALL OUR HOUSES: MEDICAL INTRIGUE AND THE DISCOVERY OF AIDS

    [Jordan Hall conference Center Auditorium] History of the Health Sciences Lecture and Medical Grand Rounds Co-presented with the Department of Medicine and the History of the Health Sciences Lecture Series This program is free and open to the entire university and the public. Health professionals who attend may apply for continuing education credit. Medical Center Hour counts toward first-year medical students' SIM requirements. The Medical Center Hour is produced weekly throughout the academic year by the Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities of the University of Virginia School of Medicine. Our series includes History of the Health Sciences Lectures, which we produce together with Historical Collections in the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library. For information, call 434.924.5974 or see https://med.virginia.edu/biomedical-ethics/ See Medical Center Hour on YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/uvamch. Videos post a week after the program.

  • 06Oct

    Alan Cherrington, PhD, 2016 Joseph Larner Memorial Lecture in Pharmacology

    [Jordan Hall Conference Center Auditorium] Research Description: A decade ago the synthesis of glycogen which occurs in the liver after oral glucose feeding was thought to be the result of the ingested glucose triggering insulin release and the insulin in turn causing the liver to take up and store the glucose. It is now clear that this storage response is much more complicated than first thought. We now know that another signal, as yet poorly understood, is involved in activating the liver, and further, that much of the glycogen deposited does not come "directly" from ingested glucose but "indirectly" from 3-carbon precursors which enter liver glycogen via the gluconeogenic pathway. We are currently using a chronically catheterized dog model to study the physiology of this "new" signal and the conditions under which liver glycogen is synthesized via the "direct" or "indirect" routes. Remarkably, if the body is exposed to an insulin level 30 times normal, the resulting hypoglycemia will be limited to a level compatible with life. The reason for this life saving response is that the stimulatory effect of insulin on glucose utilization and its inhibitory effect on glucose production are limited by a variety of hormonal and neural mechanisms. We are currently investigating the role of each mechanism in limiting insulin induced hypoglycemia using conscious dogs. In addition, we are studying the ability of the brain to sense and respond directly to insulin via vertebral and carotid artery infusion or insulin infusion into the 3rd ventricle. We are also examining the defects which occur in counterregulation in diabetes. We continue to define the actions of various hormones (insulin, glucagon, epinephrine, cortisol) and neural mediators (norepinephrine, acetylcholine, cGRP, NPY) and drugs on glucose production (glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis) and utilization by the liver. Our experiments are carried out in vivo using transgenic mice, the conscious dog and man or in vitro using perfused liver and isolated liver cells. Control over various aspects of the endocrine and/or nervous system is gained using pharmacologic and/or surgical techniques. The rates of glucose production (glycogenolysis; gluconeogenesis) and utilization, as well as ketone body production and clearance are assessed using tracer and arteriovenous differences techniques. https://medschool.vanderbilt.edu/mpb/person/alan-d-cherrington-phd

  • 06Oct
  • 07Oct

    Oct 07 ROBERT J. KADNER SYMPOSIUM IN MICROBIOLOGY 2016- 10th ANNIVERSARY SYMPOSIUM

    [Jordan Hall Conference Center Auditorium] Robert J. Kadner 10th Anniversary Symposium

  • 10Oct

    Oct 10 Special Speaker

    [MR5, Room #3005] " Dietary Control of Intestinal stem cells and cancer in Obesity"

  • 10Oct

    Oct 10 CIC Seminar Series: Peter Lipsky, MD "The B Cell Basis of Autoimmune Disease"

    [Jordan 1-17] Peter Lipsky, MD, CEO & CMO, AMPEL BioSolutions, Charlottesville

  • 11Oct
  • 12Oct
  • 12Oct

    Oct 12 ZIKA: THE SCIENCE AND THE SITUATION

    [Jordan Hall Conference Center Auditorium] The Hayden-Farr Lecture in Epidemiology and Virology and Medical Grand Rounds This program is free and open to the entire university and the public. Health professionals who attend may apply for continuing education credit. Medical Center Hour counts toward first-year medical students' SIM requirements. The Medical Center Hour is produced weekly throughout the academic year by the Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities of the University of Virginia School of Medicine. Our series includes History of the Health Sciences Lectures, which we produce together with Historical Collections in the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library. For information, call 434.924.5974 or see https://med.virginia.edu/biomedical-ethics/ See Medical Center Hour on YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/uvamch. Videos post a week after the program.

  • 13Oct

    Pharmacology Seminar by Steven Farber, PhD

    [Jordan 1-17] Hosted by Michelle Bland. Research Interests: Visualization of Lipid Metabolism and Signaling in the Zebrafish: Cells require lipids for the production of signaling molecules, membrane components, and as sources of fuel. Given their utmost necessity for proper cellular function, it is not surprising that defects in lipid metabolism underlie a number of human diseases, including obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. In 2007-08, one-third of US adults and >18% of children (ages 6-19) were classified as obese, with obesity and type 2 diabetes on the rise worldwide. The globalization of the high-fat Western diet and the concurrent rise in the incidence of lipid disorders has provided an impetus to better understand lipid metabolism in the context of metabolic dysfunction. This need to investigate the role of lipids in metabolic disease has also brought into focus questions that remain unanswered in the field. For instance, although the genes involved in cholesterol and fatty acid (FA) uptake in intestinal cells have been identified, their exact mechanisms of action are highly debated or largely unknown. Such gaps in our understanding of these genes and how they function hinders the development of effective therapeutics for lipid disorders and reveals a need to create better approaches to address them. In general, the goal of the Farber lab is to better understand the cell and molecular biology of lipids within digestive organs by exploiting the many unique attributes of the zebrafish larvae. While the zebrafish has been established as a powerful model for the study of early development, few researchers have taken advantage of the accessibility and optical clarity of the embryos and larvae to visualize lipid uptake and processing in vivo. Specifically, the laboratory has focused on studying lipid modifying and transport processes in the developing 6 day old zebrafish larvae. https://emb.carnegiescience.edu/science/faculty/steven-farber

  • 13Oct
  • 17Oct

    Oct 17 PR Journal Club

    [MR5, Room #3005]

  • 17Oct
  • 17Oct

    Oct 17 CIC Seminar Series: Paul E. Love, MD, PhD " Themis regulates TCR signaling and T cell development by controlling SHP1 phosphatase activity in thymocytes"

    [Jordan 1-17] Paul E. Love, MD, PhD, Senior Investigator, Eunice Kennedy Shriver, National Institute of Child Health & Development, NIH

  • 18Oct

    Oct 18 Pathology Seminar Series

    [HEP, 3rd floor, Room #3025] Seminar Series

  • 19Oct

    Oct 19 THE MALARIA PROJECT: THE SECRET GOVERNMENT MISSION FOR A CURE

    [Jordan Hall Conference Center Auditorium] History of the Health Sciences Lecture Co-presented with the History of the Health Sciences Lecture Series This program is free and open to the entire university and the public. Health professionals who attend may apply for continuing education credit. Medical Center Hour counts toward first-year medical students' SIM requirements. The Medical Center Hour is produced weekly throughout the academic year by the Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities of the University of Virginia School of Medicine. Our series includes History of the Health Sciences Lectures, which we produce together with Historical Collections in the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library. For information, call 434.924.5974 or see https://med.virginia.edu/biomedical-ethics/ See Medical Center Hour on YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/uvamch. Videos post a week after the program.

  • 19Oct
  • 20Oct
  • 24Oct

    Oct 24 PRPR

    [MR5, Room #3005]

  • 24Oct