- Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program | Calendar
  • 17Aug

    Aug 17 Go Girls! Fitness Support Group

    [Battle Building AND Orange Pediatrics] Come groove with us tonight!

  • 24Aug

    Aug 24 Go Girls! Fitness Support Group

    [Battle Building AND Orange Pediatrics] Come groove with us tonight!

  • 28Aug
  • 31Aug

    Aug 31 "Signaling Mechanisms Old and New in Adipocyte Metabolism and Energy Expenditure" by Sheila Collins

    [Pinn Hall 1-17] Hosted by Thurl Harris, Sheila Collins is a Professor of the Integrative Metabolism Program, Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute. Dr. Collins's laboratory is interested in the biochemical mechanisms that regulate body weight. Activation of the adrenaline receptors, specifically the members of the beta-adrenergic receptor (beta-AR) family, provides the major stimulus for the hydrolysis and release of stored lipids. They are also key drivers of a process called "nonshivering thermogenesis" in brown fat. Brown fat cells are specialized cells rich in mitochondria and largely defined by their ability to express the mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP1, which allows the dissipation of the proton gradient in the inner mitochondrial membrane to yield heat at the expense of ATP production. By understanding the beta-ARs on fat cells, their signal transduction properties and how they are regulated, we hope to be able to find a way to increase energy expenditure in fat in the fight against obesity and the devastating diseases that accompany it, such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and hypertension.

  • 31Aug

    Aug 31 Go Girls! Fitness Support Group

    [Battle Building AND Orange Pediatrics] Come groove with us tonight!

  • 06Sep

    Sep 06 MIC Seminar

    [Pinn Hall 1-17]

  • 07Sep

    Sep 07 Go Girls! Fitness Support Group

    [Battle Building AND Orange Pediatrics] Come groove with us tonight!

  • 11Sep

    Pennsylvania State University

    [Pinn Hall 1-17] CIC Seminar Series: Ziaur Rahman, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine- Pennsylvania State University - Title:"Mechanisms of the dysregulated germinal center response in the mouse models of SLE"

  • 13Sep

    Sep 13 CIC Research in Progress: Paige Kulling "Title TBA"

    [MR6, 3rd Floor, Room 3501] Paige Kulling, Grad Candidate Loughran Lab Title "TBA" Research-in-Progress (RIP) is a place for graduate students and postdocs to present their ongoing research results and to receive feedback from other researchers (i.e. students, postdocs, faculties). Questions and discussions provide technical solutions and help bring new ideas to current research. Lunch is provided. RIP starts from 1200p to 100pm in MR6, Rm 3501, unless otherwise indicated.

  • 13Sep

    Sep 13 MIC Seminar

    [Pinn Hall 1-17]

  • 14Sep

    Sep 14 Pharmacology Seminar by Jonathan Kagan

    [Pinn Hall 1-17] Hosted by Bimal Desai, Jonathan Kagan, Phd, is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School Research Focus Area: Signal transduction pathways of the immune system Ancient signaling pathways lie at the base of the initiation of immunity, serving to transmit signals from Pattern Recognition Receptors (PRRs) to trigger the activation of anti-microbial defenses. All PRRs, which evolved to detect potentially pathogenic microorganisms, operate by following two cellular rules: 1) these receptors must activate cytosolic signaling with extremely fast kinetics (within seconds of ligand binding) 2) these receptors must survey multiple cellular compartments, yet still recruit a common set of signaling proteins to each location. How does a signaling network develop that has properties of near immediate responsiveness, yet the flexibility to signal from multiple locations? While most research on immune signal transduction focuses on the effector functions of signaling proteins, we are interested in understanding how these proteins are organized in the cytosol to promote both rapid responses and the flexibility of signaling locale. Using the Toll-like Receptor (TLR) family of PRRs as a model, we seek to explain the operation of cytosolic signaling proteins that function in immune defense. TLRs promote the initiation of both innate and adaptive immunity to infectious microorganisms and as such, the regulation of TLR signaling lies at the base of important issues in human health, such as the generation of effective vaccines, autoimmunity, and even cancer. Understanding the fundamental cellular principles that control TLR signaling will likely reveal important insight into these problems and will open up new possibilities for treatment of common ailments that affect humanity. Current projects in the lab focus on addressing the following problems: 1. How are TLR signaling proteins delivered to the appropriate cellular locations to promote signal transduction? 2. What are the biochemical properties of TLR-induced signaling complexes? 3. How does the innate immune response deal with commensal bacteria in the intestine?

  • 14Sep
  • 14Sep

    Sep 14 Go Girls! Fitness Support Group

    [Battle Building AND Orange Pediatrics] Come groove with us tonight!