• 03Mar

    Mar 03 Child Health Research Center Speaker Series

    [Battle Building, 1st Floor Conference Room] Our first Child Health Research Center Seminar will be on Tuesday at noon, March 3, in the Battle Building 1st Floor Conference Room. The speaker will be Sergio D. Rosenzweig, MD, PhD. He is a pediatrician and immunologist with more than 20 years of experience in the field of primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs). He is currently the Deputy Chief of the Immunology Service at the Clinical Center, NIH and the Co-Director of the Primary Immunodeficiency Clinic, NIAID, NIH. Dr. Rosenzweig has extensively published in the field and his scientific interests are mainly focused on genetic susceptibility to infectious diseases. He recently published in NEJM his findings (based on his patients) on "Glycosylation, hypogammaglobulinemia, and resistance to viral infections" and we asked him to focus on that story. This will be a great opportunity for our clinical faculty, research faculty, residents and fellows to join a CHRC event. We hope to see you in the Battle Building Conference room on March 3rd for this exciting event!

  • 04Mar

    Mar 04 Jazz and the Art of Teaching

    [Jordan Hall Conference Center Auditorium] Medical Center Hour/Brodie Medical Education Award Lecture/Medical Grand Rounds Co-presented with the Brodie Medical Education Committee and the Academy of Distinguished Educators, in conjunction with Medical Education Research Week, UVA Medical Center Hour is available on YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/uvamch. Programs are usually posted within one week of live presentation.

  • 04Mar

    Mar 04 MIC Seminar: Jonathan Handing and Allison Batties will be presenting their research

    [Jordan Hall, 1-17] Allison Batties - Bouton Lab - BCAR3 in Mammary Gland Development and Breast Cancer Jonathan Handing - Criss Lab - TBA

  • 05Mar

    Mar 05 Pediatric Grand Rounds

    [Leonard Sandridge Auditorium, McKim Hall]

  • 05Mar
  • 05Mar

    Pharmacology Seminar by Alison Barth

    [Jordan 1-17] Hosted by Julius Zhu. Alison L. Barth, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Biological Sciences at Carnegie Mellon University. Research in the Barth lab is focused on understanding how experience assembles and alters the properties of neural circuits in the cerebral cortex, in both normal and disease states. The lab has a specific focus on somatosensation in the mouse model system, where specific types of sensory input from the skin are used to drive neural activity to change the strength of synaptic connections and the firing output of cortical neurons. This neural plasticity can result in enhanced perceptual capabilities and influence subsequent learning. A detailed examination of how synapses are changed by experience is revealing fundamental principles about both perception and learning across many neural systems. In addition, researchers in the lab are using electrophysiological recordings, electron microscopy, and computational modeling to understand how functional networks are constructed and optimized in the neocortex. Experiments take advantage of transgenic mice to manipulate gene expression and label defined neural subsets and whole-cell recording and imaging to quantitate the electrical properties of cortical neurons. Learn more: http://www.cmu.edu/bio/faculty/barth.html

  • 05Mar

    Charlottesville

    [Battle Building at UVA Children's Hospital] Join the party!

  • 05Mar

    Orange

    [Orange Pediatrics - Orange Medical Center, 661 University Ln, Suite A, Orange, VA 22960] Join the party!

  • 11Mar

    Mar 11 MIC Seminar: Hijack of an Actin Assembly Pathway by Enterohemorrhagic E. coli Leads to Lethal Disease

    [JH 1-17] John Leong, MD, PhD Professor & Chair Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology Tufts University School of Medicine Hijack of an Actin Assembly Pathway by Enterohemorrhagic E. coli Leads to Lethal Disease Host: Melissa Kendall, PhD

  • 12Mar

    Mar 12 Pediatric Grand Rounds

    [Leonard Sandridge Auditorium, McKim Hall]

  • 12Mar

    Rachel Caspi

    [Jordan 1-5] BIG Seminar - Rachel Caspi, PhD

  • 12Mar
  • 12Mar

    Charlottesville

    [Battle Building at UVA Children's Hospital] Join the party!

  • 12Mar

    Orange

    [Orange Pediatrics - Orange Medical Center, 661 University Ln, Suite A, Orange, VA 22960] Join the party!

  • 18Mar

    Mar 18 Unquiet Minds: Living with Bipolar Illness

    [Jordan Hall Conference Center Auditorium] Medical Center Hour/Ellis C. Moore Memorial Lecture of the School of Medicine Co-presented with The Women's Initiative, Charlottesville, and the 2015 Virginia Festival of the Book Medical Center Hour is available on YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/uvamch. Programs are usually posted within one week of live presentation.

  • 18Mar

    Mar 18 MIC Seminar: Virulence and transmission efficiency of HIV

    [JH 1-17] Eric Arts, PhD Professor and Chairman Department of Microbiology and Immunology Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry University of Western Ontario Virulence and transmission efficiency of HIV Hosts: Lou Hammarskjold, MD, PhD and David Rekosh, PhD

  • 19Mar

    Mar 19 Pediatric Grand Rounds

    [Leonard Sandridge Auditorium, McKim Hall]

  • 19Mar

    Charlottesville

    [Battle Building at UVA Children's Hospital] Join the party!

  • 19Mar

    Orange

    [Orange Pediatrics - Orange Medical Center, 661 University Ln, Suite A, Orange, VA 22960] Join the party!

  • 25Mar

    Mar 25 Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant?

    [Jordan Hall Conference Center Auditorium] Medical Center Hour/Koppaka V. Rao Family Foundation Lecture in Medical Humanities Medical Center Hour is available on YouTube at http://www.youtube.com/uvamch. Programs are usually posted within one week of live presentation.

  • 25Mar

    Eric Betzig, Anderson Distinguished Lecture

    [Claude Moore Med Ed Auditorium ] The first Anderson Distinguished Lecture will be given by Dr. Eric Betzig, winner of the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his stunning work on super-resolution light microscopy*. The lecture will be held at 4 PM on Wed. March 25, 2015 in the Med Ed Auditorium. A brief introduction to Dr. Betzig: Dr. Betzig obtained a BS in Physics from Caltech, and then a PhD from Cornell, where he developed the first method to break the diffraction barrier in light microscopy. He then became a PI at Bell Labs, where he refined the technology and explored its applications, including high-density data storage, semiconductor spectroscopy, and superresolution fluorescence imaging of cells. In 1993, he was the first to image single fluorescent molecules under ambient conditions, and determine their positions to better than 1/40 the wavelength of light. He then invented PALM (photoactivated localization microscopy)*, and more recently, as a Group Leader at the Howard Hughes Institute (Janelia Farms, VA), lattice light sheet microscopy. These methodologies have revolutionized our ability to visualize cell machines in time and space**, with innumerable applications in cell biology, cell physiology and medicine. *The fascinating story of Dr. Betzig's rather unconventional (risky/bold) route to PALM is told in a video at http://www.ibiology.org/ibiomagazine/issue-2/eric-betzig-and-harald-hess-developing-palm-microscopy.html. **Beautiful examples of videos using lattice light sheet microscopy can be found at: http://vimeo.com/album/3098015

  • 25Mar
  • 26Mar

    Mar 26 Pediatric Grand Rounds

    [Leonard Sandridge Auditorium, McKim Hall]

  • 26Mar
  • 26Mar

    Mar 26 Pharmacology Seminar by Judit Villen

    [Jordan Hall, Room 1-17] This seminar is hosted by Thurl Harris. Judit Villen, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Genome Sciences, University of Washington The Villen Lab seeks to develop and apply novel technologies for proteome characterization to answer fundamental questions in cell biology and disease. We use quantitative mass spectrometry to measure dynamic changes in protein abundances, protein post-translational modification states, and to characterize interaction partners across multiple cellular states. We are particularly interested in studying protein phosphorylation as a general regulatory mechanism in the cell involved in a myriad of functions: how phosphorylation is integrated into the multiple responses to shape the proteome, and how signaling circuits evolved to accommodate proteome functional complexity. http://www.gs.washington.edu/faculty/villen.htm