• 20Nov

    Nov 20 Go Girls! Fitness Support Group

    [Zion Crossroads] Come groove with us tonight!

  • 20Nov

    Title: Quest for prototypical NL1.1 (NKR-P1) ligands: A 40-year journey

    [Pinn Hall 1-17] CIC Seminar Series: James Carlyle, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Toronto - Title: Quest for prototypical NL1.1 (NKR-P1) ligands: A 40-year journey

  • 23Nov

    Nov 23 Go Girls! Fitness Support Group

    [UVA Battle Building OR Orange Pediatrics] Come groove with us tonight!

  • 27Nov

    Nov 27 Go Girls! Fitness Support Group

    [Zion Crossroads] Come groove with us tonight!

  • 27Nov
  • 29Nov
  • 29Nov

    Nov 29 CIC Research in Progress: Aaron Stevens "Brain melanoma: where are the T cells?"

    [MR6, 3rd Floor, Room 3501] Aaron Stevens, Grad Candidate Bullock Lab Title "Brain melanoma: where are the T cells?" Research-in-Progress (RIP) is a place for graduate students and postdocs to present their ongoing research results and to receive feedback from other researchers (i.e. students, postdocs, faculties). Questions and discussions provide technical solutions and help bring new ideas to current research. Lunch is provided. RIP starts from 1200p to 100pm in MR6, Rm 3501, unless otherwise indicated.

  • 29Nov

    Title TBA

    [Pinn 1017] The Center for Public Health Genomics presents the Genome Sciences Seminar Series (GS3) in both Fall and Spring semesters each Wednesday from 1-2 pm in Pinn 1-17. An outstanding slate of speakers will discuss their cutting-edge research in areas such as systems biology, epigenetics and the genetic analysis of complex disease.

  • 29Nov

    Nov 29 11/29/2017 -- MIC Seminar -- HIV assembly and maturation

    [Pinn 1-17] Eric O. Freed, PhD Director, HIV Dynamics and Replication Program; Head, Virus-Cell Interaction Section HIV Dynamics and Replication Program Center for Cancer Research National Cancer Institute

  • 30Nov

    Nov 30 "Regulation of Synaptic Transmission by Neuropeptides" by Zhiping Pang

    [Pinn Hall 1-17] Hosted by Michael Scott, Zhiping Pang, PhD is an Assistant Professor and Principal Investigator, Neuroscience and Cell Biology, Child Health Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School Mechanisms of synaptic regulation: From stem cell to the brain Dr. Pang's laboratory studies the neural basis of the regulation of feeding, satiety, metabolism and obesity. Studies may provide insights into the neural causes and consequences of childhood obesity. His lab also developed novel techniques for deriving neuronal cells from primary skin cells and pluripotent stem cells, providing novel opportunities to study the pathogenesis of neurological disorders, including pediatric developmental disorders and autism spectrum disorders.

  • 30Nov

    Nov 30 Go Girls! Fitness Support Group

    [UVA Battle Building OR Orange Pediatrics] Come groove with us tonight!

  • 04Dec

    Dec 04 Go Girls! Fitness Support Group

    [Zion Crossroads] Come groove with us tonight!

  • 04Dec

    Title: TBA

    [Pinn Hall 1-17] CIC Seminar Series: Chance (John) Luckey, PhD, Associate Professor, Pathology Department, University of Virginia - Title: TBA

  • 06Dec

    Dec 06 CIC Research in Progress: Lyndsey Muehling "Experimental infection with human rhinovirus reveals amplified anti-viral responses in allergic asthmatics"

    [MR6, 3rd Floor, Room 3501] Lyndsey Muehling, Grad Candidate Woodfolk Lab Title "Experimental infection with human rhinovirus reveals amplified anti-viral responses in allergic asthmatics" Research-in-Progress (RIP) is a place for graduate students and postdocs to present their ongoing research results and to receive feedback from other researchers (i.e. students, postdocs, faculties). Questions and discussions provide technical solutions and help bring new ideas to current research. Lunch is provided. RIP starts from 1200p to 100pm in MR6, Rm 3501, unless otherwise indicated.

  • 06Dec

    Title TBA

    [Pinn 1017 ] The Center for Public Health Genomics presents the Genome Sciences Seminar Series (GS3) in both Fall and Spring semesters each Wednesday from 1-2 pm in Pinn 1017. An outstanding slate of speakers will discuss their cutting-edge research in areas such as systems biology, epigenetics and the genetic analysis of complex disease.

  • 06Dec

    Dec 06 MIC Seminar -- Age-related stromal changes drive tumorigenesis

    [Pinn 1-17] Sheila Stewart, PhD Professor, Cell Biology and Physiology Washington University St. Louis

  • 07Dec

    Dec 07 "Fuel Metabolic Checkpoints as Targets for Cardiometabolic Disease"-2017 Joseph Larner Memorial Lecture in Pharmacology by Daniel P. Kelley

    [1st Floor PHCC (Auditorium] A lectureship was established to honor the memory of Joseph Larner, who served as Professor and Chair of the Pharmacology Department for many years. During his time as Chair he recruited and mentored numerous successful faculty, including Al Gilman. He continued to be an inspiration to everyone who knew him, especially our graduate students, who were in awe of his energy and enthusiasm as he kept up his science and maintained an active departmental presence well into his 90s. In addition to honoring Dr. Larner's memory, the goal of this lectureship is to highlight exciting new advances in an area that held great interest for him: the pervasive role of metabolism/cell signaling in human disease. About this Year's Speaker: Hosted by Thurl Harris, Daniel P. Kelly, M.D is the Willard and Rhoda Ware Professor and Director at Penn Cardiovascular Institute, University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Kelly obtained his medical degree from the University of Illinois College of Medicine, residency training at Barnes Hospital in St. Louis, and postdoctoral and clinical cardiology training at Washington University School of Medicine. He joined the Washington University School of Medicine faculty in 1989 and rapidly moved up the ranks to Professor of Medicine, Molecular Biology & Pharmacology, and Pediatrics, and served as Chief of the Cardiovascular Division and founding Director of the Center for Cardiovascular Research. In 2008, Dr. Kelly assumed the role of founding Scientific Director for the east coast Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute located in Lake Nona, Florida. In August 2017, he moved to the University of Pennsylvania where he was named Director of the Penn Cardiovascular Institute. Dr. Kelly's research interests stem from an early fascination with rare inborn errors in mitochondrial metabolism in children which cause sudden death and heart failure. As a young researcher at Washington University, Dr. Kelly defined the genetic basis for a common inborn error in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, work that led to the development of practical screening tests for newborns. Thereafter, he became interested in how similar derangements in cardiac energy metabolism contribute to heart failure and sudden death in common acquired forms of mitochondrial diseases caused by hypertension, ischemic injury, and diabetes. His work defined the transcriptional regulatory axis involved in the control of cardiac fuel and energy metabolism through pioneering fundamental studies on nuclear receptors including the PPARs, estrogen-related receptors (ERRs), and their transcriptional coactivator PGC-1. The Kelly laboratory has identified molecular "switches" in this regulatory pathway that potentially define distinct forms of heart failure, an important step towards identifying therapeutic targets for phenotype-specific treatment of heart failure. His laboratory is also engaged in translation of these discoveries, including early stage drug discovery efforts. Dr. Kelly is a recipient of the American Heart Association Basic Science Prize and currently serves on the Editorial Boards of The Journal of Clinical Investigation and the Journal of the American College of Cardiology-Basic to Translational Science.

  • 07Dec

    Dec 07 Go Girls! Fitness Support Group

    [UVA Battle Building OR Orange Pediatrics] Come groove with us tonight!

  • 08Dec

    Dec 08 BTP Journal Club

    [Pinn Hall 7100] BTP Trainee journal club/research-in-progress talk.

  • 11Dec

    Dec 11 Go Girls! Fitness Support Group

    [Zion Crossroads] Come groove with us tonight!

  • 11Dec

    Tania Watts, PhD, Professor, Department of Immunology, University of Toronto, St. George Campus, Title: A post-priming checkpoint signal 4 for T cell accumulation

    [Pinn Hall 1-17] CIC Seminar Series - Tania Watts, PhD, Professor, Department of Immunology, University of Toronto, St. George Campus, Title: A post-priming checkpoint "signal 4" for T cell accumulation

  • 13Dec

    Dec 13 CIC Research in Progress: Jake Eccles "B-cell Immunity to Human Rhinovirus Infection in Health and Disease"

    [MR6, 3rd Floor, Room 3501] Jake Eccles, Grad Student Woodfolk Lab Title "B-cell Immunity to Human Rhinovirus Infection in Health and Disease" Research-in-Progress (RIP) is a place for graduate students and postdocs to present their ongoing research results and to receive feedback from other researchers (i.e. students, postdocs, faculties). Questions and discussions provide technical solutions and help bring new ideas to current research. Lunch is provided. RIP starts from 1200p to 100pm in MR6, Rm 3501, unless otherwise indicated.

  • 13Dec

    Dec 13 MIC Graduate Student Seminar

    [Pinn 1-17] Speakers: Elizabeth McKenney, Kendall Laboratory and Aditi Upadhye, McNamara Laboratory

  • 14Dec

    Dec 14 Go Girls! Fitness Support Group

    [UVA Battle Building OR Orange Pediatrics] Come groove with us tonight!

  • 18Dec

    Dec 18 Go Girls! Fitness Support Group

    [Zion Crossroads] Come groove with us tonight!